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Diving the Tugs in Tobermory’s Little Tub Harbour December 5, 2008

Posted by Chris Sullivan in Dive Log.
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After the morning charter on the Niagara II and the Grotto, what can you do in Tobermory? Go diving of course! There are two main shore dives in Tobermory, one of them just around the corner from the docks. Even on a Saturday you can usually find parking with a few yards of the steps that descend from the street to the harbour, down which you lug your gear, including a dive flag, then carefully step over the smooth rocks into the water.

tugs-rail

Railing of the Alice G.

On the east side of the harbour there is a diving area where 3 wooden tugs are sunk. Some of it is just timbers strewn around but there is also ribbing, a boiler, and so on and the Alice G. is in pretty good shape. It’s a shallow, and therefore warm (at least in August) dive.  Water temperature was 18C at a maximum depth of 44 feet. I know many divers won’t consider that particularly warm, but for Canada its pretty good. In all the diving I’ve done here I think 22C is the maximum I’ve experienced.

Deepstop enjoying the Warm Water

Deepstop enjoying the Warm Water

tugs-ryan

Ryan with his Pink Tank

My buddy Ryan Ansell and I spent about 50 minutes underwater, finishing up at 5:37 pm. At that time of year the days are getting shorter fairly rapidly, but it is still light until around 8pm. The further you are from the equator the more  extreme the difference in the length of the day between Summer and Winter. My brother lives in Whitehorse and in mid-summer you can play golf at midnight.

That night the club met at the Stone Orchid, and Indonesian Restaurant in Tobermory. This was surprising for two reasons, one was that this restaurant existed at all (Tobermory doesn’t even have a Starbucks), and the other that my club that seems to exist on pizza, wings and beer would actually like Indonesian food. The food was pretty good, although I’m not as partial to Indonesian food as Indian or Thai.

I mentioned to Brad that I needed some dives over 100 feet to qualify for the IANTD Advanced Nitrox Certification. He said I’d get two of them the next day, and he wasn’t wrong.

More Strewn Timbers

The remains of a lost Tug

After dinner I went back to my tent in the “Happy Hearts” campground and slept like a log.

tugs-chains

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